Early years

87 total results
A framework for learning through play at school
A framework for learning through play at school

A new framework for learning through play has been developed to support teachers in the classroom and help guide policy and practice in the early years of schooling. The Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) and the LEGO Foundation have worked together to develop the framework.

Home reading experiences that support continued reading development at school
Home reading experiences that support continued reading development at school

Home support of children’s literacy skills in the early years is a well-known indicator of their reading progress at the start of school. A new study has explored how different reading experiences at home have an impact on children’s continued reading development at school.

Early years Q&A: Taking turns and sharing – student activities
Early years Q&A: Taking turns and sharing – student activities

Taking turns and sharing in early childhood develops children’s pro-social skills in the early years, helping them to thrive in school and later life. In the second part of a Q&A with Teacher, Lauren Armstrong – Lecturer in Early Childhood Education at the University of Tasmania – discusses how early years and primary teachers can support the development of these important skills.

Early years Q&A: Taking turns and sharing – research overview
Early years Q&A: Taking turns and sharing – research overview

Taking turns and sharing in early childhood develops children’s pro-social skills in the early years, helping them to thrive in school and later life. In the first instalment of a two-part Q&A, we speak with Lauren Armstrong – Lecturer in Early Childhood Education at the University of Tasmania – about the impact of these skills for school readiness, and the current research on the topic.

School playgroup exemplar – building a strong school community
School playgroup exemplar – building a strong school community

Phillippa Adgemis is Principal at Coldstream Primary School – one of the six schools highlighted in a recent Australian study exploring the common features of exemplary school playgroups. In this article, she shares more about how the playgroup is run, and the effect it has had on the school.

Student vocabulary – power and positivity feature in post-lockdown writing
Student vocabulary – power and positivity feature in post-lockdown writing

Children’s experiences inform the development of their vocabulary and, subsequently, how they view the world around them. As we head into the third year of pandemic challenges and restrictions, interesting themes have continued to emerge through students’ writing.

Six features of high-performing school playgroups
Six features of high-performing school playgroups

School playgroups benefit children, their families, schools and communities. New Australian research has identified six key features of high-performing school playgroups.

The Research Files Episode 71: Nature play
The Research Files Episode 71: Nature play

Professor Amy Cutter-Mackenzie-Knowles, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Education at Southern Cross University, joins The Research Files this month to talk about the Childhood Nature Play study. We’ll be chatting about the different types of nature play, and the teaching and learning resources that have been co-designed as a result of the research project.

Integrating algorithm tasks into early years teaching
Integrating algorithm tasks into early years teaching

Algorithms are a key component of computational thinking, and the foundations for developing these skills starts in the early years. What are some of the day-to-day ‘unplugged activities’ that offer teachers easy opportunities for emphasising and building these skills?

How teachers are depicted in picture books
How teachers are depicted in picture books

Families will often engage in the shared reading of picture books about starting Kindergarten to help children with their transition. But, how are Kindergarten teachers demographically represented in the books that children read during this time? And importantly, who is missing from these representations?