Rebecca Vukovic

Rebecca Vukovic

Rebecca Vukovic is the Deputy Editor of Teacher.

289 total results
Research Q&A: Is school safe for gender and sexuality diverse students?
Research Q&A: Is school safe for gender and sexuality diverse students?

Is school a safe place for gender and sexuality diverse students to be themselves? In today’s Q&A, Western Sydney University researcher Dr Jacqueline Ullman shares findings from her report Free2Be…Yet?, a follow-up to 2015’s Free2Be?. It details the findings from a second nationwide survey of gender and sexuality diverse Australian secondary school students.

Tokyo Games: Do the Olympics inspire us to be more active?
Tokyo Games: Do the Olympics inspire us to be more active?

After an unprecedented one-year postponement, the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics are scheduled to begin on 23 July and 24 August. While billions of fans around the world tune in to their favourite sporting moments from home, the question remains – Does elite sport performance act as a catalyst to increased mass sport participation?

Teacher sources of stress by school sector
Teacher sources of stress by school sector

Do teachers in state schools encounter the same work stressors as their colleagues working in the private sector? And if so, what are those stressors? Jude Brady and Dr Elaine Wilson from the University of Cambridge in the UK have collected and analysed data from 40 teachers to find out more.

Podcast special: Professor Rich Lehrer on Maths and Science reasoning
Podcast special: Professor Rich Lehrer on Maths and Science reasoning

Ahead of ACER’s Research Conference next month, we sat down with Professor Rich Lehrer from Vanderbilt University to discuss his research that explores science and mathematics education for elementary school students in the US. He also gives listeners a taste of what he’ll be sharing at the conference and why he decided to name his keynote address ‘Accountable Assessment’.

Adults engaging in reading for pleasure
Adults engaging in reading for pleasure

We often hear about why it’s important that children read for pleasure, but we don’t seem to place that same importance on adults’ reading habits. So, is it important that adults read for enjoyment? And if so, how many adults actually read for pleasure on a regular basis? We talk to Dr Judith Seaboyer from the University of Queensland to find out more.

Real world maths – selecting a sporting Greatest of All Time
Real world maths – selecting a sporting Greatest of All Time

Who was the Greatest of All Time (GOAT) of women’s tennis in 2018? Teams participating in this year’s International Mathematical Modeling Challenge (IM2C) were tasked with developing and applying a model to determine just that.

Teacher Staffroom Episode 27: Read all about it
Teacher Staffroom Episode 27: Read all about it

In today’s episode of Teacher Staffroom, we shine a spotlight on reading. From encouraging students to find a love of reading, to ensuring they have access to a wide variety of texts, to the books children borrowed most frequently from libraries in 2020 – there was so much to squeeze into today’s podcast.

School leadership: Improving student access to books
School leadership: Improving student access to books

‘Every assembly I read a book to the whole school and I expect all of our teachers to be reading aloud to our kids every day.’ Christies Beach Primary School Principal Catherine O’Dea shares why encouraging students to develop a love of reading is the key aim of the South Australian school’s improvement plan.

Listening to music to improve wellbeing
Listening to music to improve wellbeing

Music is universal across human populations as all cultures, from the most primitive to the most advanced, make and listen to music. But what is it about music that we enjoy so much? And, what impact does listening to music have on our overall sense of wellbeing? We ask Dr Margaret Osborne from the University of Melbourne.

Research Q&A: Increasing physical activity in the early years
Research Q&A: Increasing physical activity in the early years

A new study by researchers at the University of Canberra has seen three- and four-year olds increase their daily total physical activity by 28 minutes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity by 16 minutes. In today’s Q&A, Dr Rohan Telford and Professor Dick Telford discuss the key findings and the importance of physical literacy in developing primary school readiness.